Wednesday, April 17, 2019

#2223 "Covey of Cattle"

These cattle belong to the Covey Family which has farmed the area since 1905 or so. Most people think of a covey as a flock of birds but the dictionary clearly describes the term as suitable for describing a small group of people or things. This covey of cows were happily munching away on a couple of 1100 pound round bales of hay. Each of these round bales would cost $50 if you wanted your own. The round bales are the bovine version of the human water-cooler. I can only imagine the conversations between these cows as they watched the traffic go by on Red Horse Lake Road. There were nine cows at this non-baleful bovine meeting. They were simply having a good chin wag as the virga wafted above them. The Holsteins on the right may look like twins. It is actually the same cow duplicated with a few subtle modifications.

I was on my way back home but stopped to visit with these bovines. They were always friendly and curious and I thought I could create something special out of the overcast nimbostratus day. The ground was snow-packed and the virga in the sky meant that more snow was on the way.

For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.
 For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

#2222 "Winter Outlet Boat Houses"

I was looking for something other than sunset clouds over Singleton Lake to paint. I have been painting a lot of sunsets lately. It was chilly outside in the cold conveyor belt of the next winter storm. Plein air was out of the question so there was a need to find some other inspiration.

It had been an overcast day with some light snow falling when I wandered around the Outlet of Charleston Lake in November of 2018. I was interested in the reflections of my favourite boat houses in the choppy waters of the Outlet. Motion and rhythm is important in what I am trying to say with my art. I hope you can feel the pulse in the nimbostratus, the trees, the water and even the siding of the boat houses. I have painted these before: #1636 "Outlet Reflections" #1637 "Charleston Boat Houses" #1762 "Outlet Row of Boat Houses" and maybe a few more times. I forget. (#1591 Outlet Boat Houses, #952 Outlet Afternoon, #954 Midday Outlet )

For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.
 For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.

Sunday, April 14, 2019

#2221 "Singleton Squally Snow"

This was a day after a major winter storm crossed Ontario. A series of cold fronts would usher fresh and clean Arctic air over eastern Ontario.
The winds were gusting to 45 knots and perhaps stronger. I do not own an anemometer but things tend to break with wind gusts of 50 knots. The Arctic air over the Great Lakes was cold enough to create classic lake effect snowsqualls. What was very unusual was that the squalls reaching Singleton were actually originating from Lake Michigan with a bit of a boost from Lake Huron too. I strongly suspect that there was possibly a cold frontal component to this particular snowsquall as well. The dark looking cloud low on the horizon was producing a heavy snow flurry. The snow would be much closer in just 15 more minutes. The weather is never dull.

I liked the way that the convective squalls look at 6:00 pm. I would also paint how they looked just 15 minutes later in #2220 "Windy Singleton Snow Squalls".

For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.
 For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.

Friday, April 12, 2019

#2220 "Windy Singleton Snow Squalls"

This was a day after a major winter storm crossed Ontario. A series of cold fronts would usher fresh and clean Arctic air over eastern Ontario. The winds were gusting to 45 knots and perhaps stronger.

The Arctic air over the Great Lakes was cold enough to create classic lake effect snowsqualls. What was very unusual was that the squalls reaching Singleton were actually originating from Lake Michigan with a bit of a boost from Lake Huron too. I strongly suspect that there was possibly a cold frontal component to this particular snowsquall as well.

Note the shaft of heavy snow beyond the west shore of Singleton Lake. The cumulus tower was strongly bent over with the stronger winds aloft. Cumulus tufts were being shredded and torn apart in the strong winds like cotton candy. The weather is never dull.

I liked the way that the convective squalls look at 6:15 pm. I would also paint how they looked just 15 minutes earlier at 6 pm in #2221 "Singleton Squally Snow".

For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.
 For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

#2219 "November Sunset Stratocumulus"

The sunset is very yellow but the clouds have a strong red and pink colour to them. Hmm. Why? These cloud droplets may have been young and smaller than average but that cannot be the entire story. Both Rayleigh and Mie scattering painted my sunset view. This sunset view was from 4:40 pm on Wednesday November 21st, 2018. The dissipating stratocumulus were in the northwesterly flow behind a cold front. Art gives me a chance to practise science as well.

Rayleigh scattering is strongly dependent upon the size of the particle and the wavelengths. The intensity of the Rayleigh scattered radiation increases rapidly as the ratio of particle size to wavelength increases - the scatterers get bigger. The intensity of Rayleigh scattered radiation is also identical in the forward and reverse directions.

At sunset short wavelength blue light is scattered out of the direct beam by the long path of the light through the atmospheric molecules which are really the Rayleigh scatters. By the time the direct beam from the sun got over Singleton Lake after the long trek through the atmosphere, only long red wavelengths remained. However I needed something to scatter the remaining direct beam red light to my eye.

The Mie scattering model takes over from Rayleigh when the particle size becomes larger than around 10% of the wavelength of the radiation. Mie scattering is roughly independent of wavelength and it is larger in the forward direction than in the reverse direction. The greater the particle size, the more of the light is scattered in the forward direction - in this case toward my eye.

To finish the construction of my scene I needed the turbulent stratocumulus clouds. Some of the cloud particles might have been small enough by Rayleigh but really (humour intended) all I needed was Mie scattering to forward the some of the remaining red light in the direct beam from the sun to my waiting eyes. Note that the edges of the backlit cloud are much more red than the centers. Only a few scattering interaction are possible on the thin edges of the cloud where there are relatively few droplets to do the scattering. More Mie scatters in the bulk of the cloud jumble all of the remaining direct beam together so that the artist sees a mixture of the remaining wavelengths and simply a darker colour of cloud.

For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.
 For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.

Monday, April 8, 2019

#2218 "Sunset Concert in AC and CI"

A winter storm was on the way and this is the way it looked early on the evening of Wednesday December 19th, 2018. Company was just about to arrive in time for Christmas and this winter storm would make certain that it would be a white one. I have always compared the forces that construct the lines and shapes in the atmosphere as more of a ballet than a battle. One can also compare it to a musical where each line and shape have a tune to play. If you put all of the notes together you can achieve a concert or maybe even a symphony. The chords in this piece are composed of altocumulus and cirrus and of course the rays from the setting sun. Whether it be music or art, they are still sciences and branches of the same tree of learning.

Understanding the weather simplifies into a few very important conceptual models of specific weather patterns. The Conveyor Belt Conceptual Model (CBCM) of a storm system is the most important of these. The important step is to find your specific location within the CBCM of the storm and thus understand the weather that will cross your path. Large conceptual models are typically composed of smaller dynamic meteorological features which can also be represented by conceptual models. All of the weather estimates are in a relative sense compared to the current conditions. Quantitative weather requires actual measurement and not just visual observations.

This pattern is actually a favourite of mine and it dates back to the 1980's after a lecture from Roger Weldon. Roger had opened the wonder of the deformation zone to me. What I wanted to know was "why" the line was shaped the way it was. If one knew why then how and when and understanding the weather had to follow. I made a long and happy career out of those questions.

This was a nearly a straight deformation zone gently bowed in the direction of the warm conveyor belt (WCB). The col in the deformation zone was further to the north and I was looking at the anticyclonic quadrant of the WCB deformation zone.
The partner cyclonic quadrant of that deformation zone was overhead Singleton Lake and still had some lift to generate the altocumulus. The lines in the sky can all be understood and explained. A picture is worth a lot of words. Several pictures can be worth many more.

Of course one does not need to know any of this to enjoy the sunset.

For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.
 For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.

Saturday, April 6, 2019

#2217 "Ontario Snowsquall Sunset"

Southwesterly squalls off Lake Ontario are a very rare event for Singleton Lake. The fetch over the relatively warm waters of Lake Ontario is not very long from 210 degrees. Seldom is the air originating from the southwest cold enough to achieve the crucial 13 Celsius degree temperature difference between the water and the air at about 5000 feet above the surface. Shore line convergence is also not very beneficial with that wind direction. Southwesterly snowsqualls seldom develop.

I believe that a secondary cold front and the associated convergence played a big roll in generating this particular bit of weather. The wind howled and the snow blew and drifted deep. It was a wild day outside. It was also the second day of "Skate the Lake" on the Big Rideau. Only the hardiest souls skated. Making progress against the wind was a challenge on skates but going with the wind was a breeze.

This sunset was after all of the action had died down. Daytime instability over the land even given the meagre input from the late January sun, causes snowsqualls to penetrate much further inland from the lake shore. These snowsqualls were going to fizzle over Singleton Lake and it was going to be a clear and cold wintery night.

There are many shapes in these dissipating and wind torn fragments of cumulus. A dragon, armadillo and several other creatures can be found. There is even the blue bird of happiness flapping its wings.

I included the neighbour's porch light on the dark western shore of Singleton where the sun sets early. My friend Dale was apparently not yet retired and he would have been out working hard to keep the township roads passable. He does a terrific job and will be missed when he does retire.

For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.
 For this and much more art, click on Pixels. Thank you.

#2223 "Covey of Cattle"

These cattle belong to the Covey Family which has farmed the area since 1905 or so. Most people think of a covey as a flock of birds but ...