Sunday, June 24, 2018

#0134 "Fall River"

From 1984...
This is looking southeast along the Shubie Canal in the fall of 1983..from our backyard along Lockview Road in Fall River Nova Scotia. The canal system was supposed to link Dartmouth and the Atlantic to the Bay of Fundy. The canal was not very successful. The water way did provide some wonderful canoeing though. I would put the two small kids in the canoe after coming home from a night shift and paddle for a couple of hours into the adjoining lakes. Lake Thomas was upstream toward Halifax and Fletchers Lake was downstream.
The internet did not exist when I painted this in 1984 but a search for information now reveals a ton of information at a click of the keyboard. The Shubenacadie Canal was a Canadian canal in central Nova Scotia linking Halifax Harbour with the Bay of Fundy by way of the Shubenacadie River and Shubenacadie Grand Lake. Begun in 1826, it was not completed until 1861 and was closed in 1871. The canal enjoyed a few years of healthy traffic especially during the Waverley gold rushes of the 1860s. However the canal company showed little profit and experienced many problems relating to frigid winters which damaged the locks linking the freshwater lakes.
Our two tame ducks were rounding the rocks I had piled there. Annie and Jake would come for some bread from the hands of our children most days. I lost my finger nail moving those rocks which were supposed to help stop any erosion and provide a little pool for the kids to play. They were not in school yet.
 For this and much more...

Saturday, June 23, 2018

#0145 "Windsor Junction, Nova Scotia - Revisited"

A memory from 1985...
This is the Windsor Junction Train Station outside Bedford Nova Scotia as it appeared in mid-summer just before it was demolished in late August 1984. George Orwell would not have approved. It was offered for sale for $1.00, as long as the buyers would remove it off the property...unfortunately there were no takers. A lot of people would have traveled those tracks on their way to the Maritimes and two world wars.

This was the second time that I painted this characteristic structure. I painted #0137 "Windsor Junction, Nova Scotia". I was intrigued by the contrast between old and new. We attended the church across the road. I took several pictures and those images plus the feelings of the moment are what the painting is based on.

I would have painted this in the basement guest room of our home at 167 Lockview Road, Fall River, Nova Scotia. I was painting high realism in oils at the time.
 For this and much more...

Friday, June 22, 2018

#0096 "Silver Sands, Nova Scotia"

From the summer of 1980...
This was at the beach in the summer of 1978 at Silver Sands, just northeast of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. I was trying to be really loose with the paint.

I was learning the science of meteorology at CFB Shearwater. The Maritimes is a great place to learn about the weather directly from the atmosphere. We moved to Alberta so that I could pursue my Masters of Meteorology with some professors that I respected greatly.

I would have painted this in the studio in the corner of the guest bedroom in our condo in Millwoods, Edmonton, Alberta. I never stopped painting even as I was learning the meteorology of Alberta.
 For this and much more...

Thursday, June 21, 2018

#0142 "High Tide at Eastern Passage"

From 1985...

This was another foggy morning at Eastern Passage. It was a quiet morning at the port on the east end of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Notice that no one was working during lobster season. I thought that was strange but there must have been a good reason. I hope these boats are still a float.

I would have painted this in the basement guest room of our home at 167 Lockview Road, Fall River, Nova Scotia. I was painting high realism in oils at the time.
 For this and much more art...

Sunday, June 10, 2018

#0093 "Quaint Cove"

This is the view in Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia from the Government Pier in the spring of 1979. The red boat always stays red but the super-structure changes from white to turquoise and back again over the course of several years. In 1979, the top was turquoise.
Peggy's Cove was quiet in 1979. There were tourists but not like now. We spent a lot of time at Peggy's Cove in the BC Era - Before Children. The best days were during the nastiest and windiest fall and winter storms. One could safely watch the waves crash over the rugged granite shore while enjoying a bowl of really tasty chowder at the Sou'Wester Restaurant ... Good times all brought back to the top of one's memory bank by a simple painting. For me that is what art is all about. If the art invokes similar memories in others, then that is definitely special.

Shearwater was my first meteorological posting. If you wish to learn about the weather, go east young man. The weather was always changing and the art of a careful analysis of the science and the observations were key to understanding the meteorology and the concern of the day. I wish I had a few of those early analyses on hand plotted maps with coloured terrain. The weather of the eastern seaboard taught me a lot. I am still learning.
The Sou'Wester was celebrating its 50th Anniversary in 2018 and going strong. We always return when we get back to Nova Scotia.
I would have painted this in the studio in the corner of the guest bedroom in our condo in Millwoods, Edmonton, Alberta. I never stopped painting even as I was learning the meteorology of Alberta. Funny... I do not remember getting old?
 For this and much more art...

Saturday, June 9, 2018

#0071 "Red Roses"

From the fall of 1978...
A group of three roses at distinctly different stages in blooming. The drawing went really well in water colour. I rarely purchase flowers. There is a reluctance to contribute to the premature death of something so beautiful. Sometimes I make exceptions though. My Dad brought home flowers almost every Friday. I did not get that "purchase flowers" gene I guess.
 For this and so much more...

Friday, June 8, 2018

#0064 "Cold and Lonely"

From the winter of 1977-1978...

This was an abandoned home in Chezzetcook, Nova Scotia during the winter of 1977-1978. This was once a proud home but people move on I guess. This cold scene made me feel very nostalgic. I forget whether this was East Chezzetcook, Head of Chezzetcook, Lower East Chezzetcook, or West Chezzetcook. The rugged coast of Nova Scotia naturally divides the close knit communities.
I was still learning about the weather of the Maritimes and as much as I could about real meteorology. Winter weather was even more challenging than fog. The frontal zone would align along a northeast to southwest orientation along the length of Nova Scotia. Abundant cold and dry winter air to the northwest contrasted sharply with warm and moist air over the Atlantic. The lack of friction and the release of latent heat over the ocean would fuel some vigourous storms that would then ripple along the frontal boundary every few days in the winter. I updated the 1955 work of J. J. George who studied this important forecast problem. His work was just as applicable in 1978 before satellite and radar data became readily available. My update of George's work got good reviews even though I found out that people thought the the author was dead...

The science of winter storms was still elusive even if there had been a few successful forecasts. Never stop learning...

I would have painted this in the guest bedroom on the southwest corner of our apartment in the Woodlawn Mall area of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. My studio was in the extreme corner and the sewing area on the opposite wall when guests were not visiting.
 For this and much more art...


#0134 "Fall River"

From 1984... This is looking southeast along the Shubie Canal in the fall of 1983..from our backyard along Lockview Road in Fall River N...